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Information on Tanzania Travel

TANZANIA
 Officially the United Republic of Tanzania or in Swahili: Jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania), is a country in East Africa within the African Great Lakes region. It is bordered by Kenya and Uganda to the north; Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west; Zambia, Malawi, and Mozambique to the south; and the Indian Ocean to the east. Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest mountain, is in northeastern Tanzania.
Tanzania's population of 44.9 million is highly diverse, composed of numerous ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups. Tanzania is a presidential constitutional republic, and since 1996, its official capital has been Dodoma, where the President's Office, the National Assembly, and some government ministries are located. Dar es Salaam, the former capital, retains most government offices and is the country's largest city, principal port, and leading commercial center.[13][14][15]
European colonialism began in mainland Tanzania during the late 19th century when Germany formed German East Africa, which gave way to British rule following World War I. The mainland was governed as Tanganyika, with the Zanzibar Archipelago remaining a separate colonial jurisdiction. Following their respective independence in 1961 and 1963, the two entities merged in April 1964 to form the United Republic of Tanzania.
 VISA REQUIREMENTS

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Travellers to Tanzania require a valid Visa each time they enter the Republic.
The granting of a Tanzanian Visa is, in effect, only a form of pre-entry clearance. It does not guarantee permission to enter Tanzania. The Immigration Officer reserves the right to grant or deny admission. Visa holders are subject to normal Immigration control at the port of entry. They should therefore carry with them, for possible presentation to Immigration officers, the documents submitted with their applications.
In principle, all visitors, except those with no visa requirement as listed below, must obtain a visa prior to entry to Tanzania.
Visas can be obtained at any Diplomatic or Consulate Mission of the United Republic of Tanzania abroad , normally within one business day. Visitors are urged to do so to avoid any possible inconvenience at point of entry in Tanzania.
It is possible, however, to obtain a tourist's visa for a single entry at any one of the following four main entry points to Tanzania, subject to the fulfilment of all immigration and health requirements:
    Dar es Salaam International Airport
    Zanzibar International Airport
    Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA)
    Namanga Entry Point (Tanzania-Kenya boarder point)
(This facility is generally for those who could not apply for a visa from a Tanzania Mission abroad) For all other entry points in Tanzania, visitors must hold valid visa prior to arrival.

Nationals of the following countries have no visa requirement
Botswana ,Gambia ,Ghana ,Hong Kong, Kenya ,Lesotho ,Malawi, Malaysia ,Mozambique ,Namibia Swaziland Uganda ,Zambia ,Zimbabwe
 
Nationals of the following countries require visa
Afghanistan ,Abkhazia ,Azerbaijan, Bangladesh ,Chad ,Djibouti, Ethiopia, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzten ,  Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania ,Morocco, Niger, Palestine Refugees and Stateless individuals, Senegal ,Somalia, Sierra Leone, Tajikistan ,Turkmenistan Uzbekistan
Passport validity
Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of your visa application.
The Tanzanian authorities have confirmed they will accept British passports extended by 12 months by British Embassies and Consulates under additional measures put in place in mid-2014.
UK Emergency Travel Documents
UK Emergency Travel Documents, with a minimum of six months’ validity, are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Tanzania.

Health
Yellow fever vaccination
Yellow fever vaccination is required for travellers who are arriving from, or have transited through, countries with risk of yellow fever transmission
ECONOMY
As of 2014, Tanzania's gross domestic product (GDP) was an estimated $36.6 billion, or $86.4 billion on a purchasing power parity (PPP) basis. Tanzania is a poor country, with a per capita GDP of $1,813 (PPP) which was 32 percent below the average of $2,673 for the 45 sub-Saharan African countries and ranked 23rd among those countries
From 2009 through 2013, Tanzania's per capita GDP (based on constant local currency) grew an average of 3.5 percent per year, higher than any other member of the East African Community (EAC) and exceeded by only nine countries in Sub-Saharan Africa: the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Lesotho, Liberia, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.Tanzania's largest trading partners in 2012 for its US $5.5 billion in exports were South Africa, Switzerland, and China. Its imports totalled US $11.7 billion, with Switzerland, China, and the United Arab Emirates being the biggest partners.
Agriculture
The Tanzanian economy is heavily based on agriculture, which accounts for 24.5 percent of gross domestic product, provides 85 percent of exports, and accounts for half of the employed workforce. The agricultural sector grew 4.3 percent in 2012, less than half of the Millennium Development Goal target of 10.8 percent. 16.4 percent of the land is arable  with 2.4 percent of the land planted with permanent crops.
Maize was the largest food crop on the Tanzania mainland in 2013 (5.17 million tonnes), followed by cassava (1.94 million tonnes), sweet potatoes (1.88 million tonnes), beans (1.64 million tonnes), bananas (1.31 million tonnes), rice (1.31 million tonnes), and millet (1.04 million tonnes). Sugar was the largest cash crop on the mainland in 2013 (296,679 tonnes), followed by cotton (241,198 tonnes), cashew nuts (126,000 tonnes), tobacco (86,877 tonnes), coffee (48,000 tonnes), sisal (37,368 tonnes), and tea (32,422 tonnes). Beef was the largest meat product on the mainland in 2013 (299,581 tonnes), followed by lamb/mutton (115,652 tonnes), chicken (87,408 tonnes), and pork (50,814 tonnes).
According to the 2002 National Irrigation Master Plan, 29.4 million hectares in Tanzania are suitable for irrigation farming; however, only 310,745 hectares in June 2011 were actually being irrigated.[88]
Industry and construction
Industry and construction is a major and growing component of the Tanzanian economy, contributing 22.2 percent of GDP in 2013. This component includes mining and quarrying, manufacturing, electricity and natural gas, water supply, and construction. Mining contributed 3.3 percent of GDP in 2013. The vast majority of the country's mineral export revenue comes from gold, accounting for 89 percent of the value of those exports in 2013. It also exports sizable quantities of gemstones, including diamonds and tanzanite. All of Tanzania's coal production, which totalled 106,000 short tons in 2012, is used domestically. Other minerals exploited in Tanzania include pozzolana, salt, gypsum, kaolinite, silver ore, copper, phosphate, tin, graphite, and bauxite.
Tourism
Travel and tourism contributed 12.7 percent of Tanzania's gross domestic product and employed 11.0 percent of the country's labor force (1,189,300 jobs) in 2013. The sector is growing rapidly, with overall receipts rising from US $1.74 billion in 2004 to US $4.48 billion in 2013 and receipts from international tourists rising from US $1.255 billion in 2010 to US $1.880 billion in 2013. In 2012, 1,043,000 tourists arrived at Tanzania's borders compared to 590,000 in 2005The vast majority of tourists visit Zanzibar or a "northern circuit" of Serengeti National Park, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCA), Tarangire National Park, Lake Manyara National Park, and Mount Kilimanjaro. In 2013, the most visited national park was Serengeti (452,485 tourists), followed by Manyara (187,773) and Tarangire (165,949). According to a 2013 published report, around 600,000 persons visit the NCA annually, earning 56 billion Tanzanian shillings in 2012.
Banking
The Bank of Tanzania is the central bank of Tanzania and is primarily responsible for maintaining price stability, with a subsidiary responsibility for issuing Tanzanian shilling notes and coins. At the end of 2013, the total assets of the Tanzanian banking industry were 19.5 trillion Tanzanian shillings, a 15 percent increase over 2012.
Transport
Most transport in Tanzania is by road; road transport constitutes over 75 percent of the country's freight traffic and 80 percent of its passenger traffic .Tanzania has two railway companies: TAZARA, which provides service between Dar es Salaam and Kapiri Mposhi (in a copper-mining district in Zambia), and Tanzania Railways Limited, which connects Dar es Salaam with central and northern Tanzania. Tanzania has four international airports, along with over 100 small airports or landing strips; airport infrastructure tends to be in poor condition. Airlines in Tanzania include Air Tanzania, Precision Air, Fastjet, Coastal Aviation, and ZanAir. Several modern hydrofoil boats provide transportation across the Indian Ocean between Dar es Salaam and Zanzibar.
Communications
The communications sector is the fastest growing sector in Tanzania, expanding 22.8 percent in 2013; however, the sector accounted for only 2.4 percent of gross domestic product that year. As of 2011, Tanzania had 56 mobile telephone subscribers per 100 inhabitants, a rate slightly above the sub-Saharan average. Very few Tanzanians have fixed-line telephones. Approximately 12 percent of Tanzanians used the internet as of 2011, though this number is rapidly growing.